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John McCall, South Florida Sun-Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images(HOLLYWOOD, Fla.) --  Newly released 911 calls capture the unfolding crisis at a Florida nursing home that lost its air conditioning after Hurricane Irma, subjecting its patients to sweltering heat and ultimately leading to the deaths of 14 people.

In the first call from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills during the early hours of Sept. 13, an unidentified employee tells the dispatcher a patient is in cardiac arrest. "I saw her slouch over. I noticed she is not breathing," the employee says.

In another call, an employee sighs, "Whatta night," while describing her patient's condition. By the fourth call, an employee remarks, "Oh my God, this is crazy," as she goes back and forth with the dispatcher.

As the calls continue coming in, employees at the nursing home sound increasingly frenzied as they describe patients in various states of respiratory distress. By the sixth and final call, the dispatcher asks whether they've called already. "It's for a different patient," replies the employee.

The calls were released Monday by Hollywood Police.

Geoffrey D. Smith, an attorney for the nursing home, had no comment on the calls. "We have been asking for these records since the incidents occurred. To date, we have not had access to the 911 calls and are still waiting for responses to our multiple public record requests," he said.

Florida officials have suspended the nursing's home license in the wake of the deaths. The facility is now the subject of a criminal investigation.

More than 100 residents were evacuated from the nursing home, which is affiliated with the Larkin Community Hospital, on Sept. 13 after the facility's air conditioning system failed.

Medical staff from Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood, which is near the nursing home, described a chaotic scene of evacuating the patients from the nursing home after three came into the emergency room with "extraordinarily high temperatures." Some of the patients who were admitted to the hospital had temperatures of upwards of 106 degrees, hospital officials told ABC News last month.

Nursing home administrator Jorge Carballo said in a statement shortly after the facility was evacuated in September that the home had suffered "a prolonged power failure to the transformer which powered the facility's air conditioning system as a result of the hurricane."

"Facility administration is cooperating fully with relevant authorities to investigate the circumstances that led to this unfortunate and tragic outcome. Our hearts go out to the families and friends of those who were affected," he added.

In a later statement, Carballo said, "The center and its medical and administrative staff diligently prepared" for the hurricane.

"We took part in emergency management preparedness calls with local and state emergency officials, other nursing homes and health regulators," he said. "While our center did not lose power during the storm, it did lose one transformer that powers the air conditioning unit. The center immediately contacted Florida Power & Light and continued to follow up with them for status updates on when repairs would be made. Outreach was also made to local emergency officials and first responders.”

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has vowed to hold those responsible for the deaths accountable.

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ABCNews.com(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump touched a nerve with former White House officials after saying on Monday that previous presidents did not make phone calls to the families of fallen service members.

Trump was responding to a question about why he has not yet made remarks about the four special operations servicemen killed in Niger almost two weeks ago. Trump, speaking from the Rose Garden in a surprise press conference with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he plans on contacting the families soon.

“If you look at President [Barack] Obama and other presidents, most of them didn't make calls. A lot of them didn't make calls. I like to call when it's appropriate, when I think I am able to do it,” said Trump. “They have made the ultimate sacrifice. So generally I would say that I like to call. I'm going to be calling them. I want a little time to pass. I'm going to be calling them.”

Trump later walked back the comments accusing his predecessors of not calling families of people killed in combat. “I don't know if he did. No, no, no,” said Trump. “I was -- I was told that he didn't often, and a lot of presidents don't. They write letters.”

But former White House administration officials were riled by the accusation.

"President Trump’s claim is unequivocally wrong," a former Obama official said in a statement to ABC News. "President Obama engaged families of the fallen and wounded warriors throughout his presidency through calls, letters, visits to Section 60 at Arlington, visits to Walter Reed, visits to Dover, and regular meetings with Gold Star Families at the White House and across the country."

“President Bush wrote all the families of the fallen, and called and/or met privately with hundreds if not thousands,” a spokesperson to former President George W. Bush told ABC News.

An aide to President Bill Clinton also called the claim false. "He did call the families of fallen soldiers while in office," the official told ABC News.

Alyssa Mastromonaco, former White House deputy chief of staff and a longtime scheduler for Obama, told ABC News, “It is unconscionable that a president would dare to ever portray another as unpatriotic, which is essentially what he was doing.”

Other Obama officials took to Twitter to respond, including former deputy national security adviser for strategic communications Ben Rhodes:

"This is an outrageous and disrespectful lie even by Trump standards. Also: Obama never attacked a Gold Star family," Rhodes wrote, referring to Trump’s feud with the Khans, the parents of deceased U.S. Army officer Capt. Humayun Khan.

 

This is an outrageous and disrespectful lie even by Trump standards. Also: Obama never attacked a Gold Star family. https://t.co/JgzTUIzWIa

— Ben Rhodes (@brhodes) October 16, 2017

 

Meanwhile, Democratic National Committee deputy press secretary Brian Gabriel said in a statement on Monday, “The commander-in-chief told a totally irresponsible and disgusting lie in the Rose Garden today, claiming past presidents did not call the families of fallen service members. Trump’s jaw-dropping, disrespectful lie is not based anywhere in reality and is another symptom of a deep-seated obsession with tearing down President Obama.”

ABC News reached out for comment from the spokespeople for former Presidents George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter.

Press secretary Sarah Sanders later said in a statement, "The president wasn't criticizing predecessors, but stating a fact."

"When American heroes make the ultimate sacrifice, presidents pay their respects," she said. "Sometimes they call, sometimes they send a letter, other times they have the opportunity to meet family members in person. This president, like his predecessors, has done each of these. Individuals claiming former presidents, such as their bosses, called each family of the fallen, are mistaken."

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Chance Yeh/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Hollywood is up in arms over the allegations surrounding Harvey Weinstein and the company he co-founded, The Weinstein Company.

The Producers Guild of America's national board of directors and officers voted on Monday to expel Weinstein after numerous women claimed the movie mogul and producer sexually harassed or sexually assaulted them.

"This morning, the PGA’s National Board of Directors and Officers decided by unanimous vote to institute termination proceedings concerning Harvey Weinstein’s membership,” co-presidents Gary Lucchesi and Lori McCreary said in a statement on behalf of the board. “As required by the PGA’s Constitution, Mr. Weinstein will be given the opportunity to respond before the Guild makes its final determination on November 6, 2017.”

“Sexual harassment of any type is completely unacceptable. This is a systemic and pervasive problem requiring immediate industry-wide action,” the statement continued.

The co-presidents also announced a new task force in the wake of Weinstein’s allegations.

“Today, the PGA’s National Board and Officers – composed of 20 women and 18 men -- created the Anti-Sexual Harassment Task Force specifically charged with researching and proposing substantive and effective solutions to sexual harassment in the entertainment industry,” the statement said. “The PGA calls on leaders throughout the entertainment community to work together to ensure that sexual abuse and harassment are eradicated from the industry.”

Weinstein has denied any allegations of non-consensual sex in a statement to The New Yorker.

However, in addition to the PGA, here are the other organizations and companies that have severed ties with the disgraced producer.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The preeminent organization honoring the best in film said in a statement Saturday that it's voted to expel Weinstein.

It did so "to send a message that the era of willful ignorance and shameful complicity in sexually predatory behavior and workplace harassment in our industry is over."

Weinstein and the academy had a pretty long history, dating back to 1990 when he launched an Oscars campaign for an independent film, "My Left Foot." The film went on to win two Oscars for its stars -- Daniel Day Lewis and Brenda Fricker -- and began Weinstein's long career in earning the golden trophies.

During his tenure at Miramax and later The Weinstein Company, which he founded in 2005 with his brother, Bob Weinstein, the producer racked up 341 Academy Award nominations, winning 81 of them.

The Weinstein Company

Weinstein's own film company terminated him last week after The New York Times and The New Yorker reported the stories of several women, including actress Ashley Judd, who claimed that the producer had sexually harassed or sexually assaulted them.

"In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company -- Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar -- have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately," according to a statement from the company's board.

By Monday, private equity firm Colony Capital announced that it had "entered into a preliminary agreement" with Weinstein's former film company to potentially acquire all or part of it.

Tarak Ben Ammar, a Weinstein Company board member, praised the move, saying in part: "We believe that Colony's investment and sponsorship will help stabilize the Company's current operations, as well as provide comfort to our critical distribution, production and talent partners around the world."

British Academy of Film and Television Arts

BAFTA announced in a statement last Wednesday that Weinstein's membership had been revoked.

Previously, the producer was a fixture on the BAFTA awards circuit, hosting several events around the awards itself, including a pre-dinner and an after party.

"Whilst BAFTA has previously been a beneficiary of Mr. Weinstein’s support for its charitable work, it considers the reported alleged behaviour completely unacceptable and incompatible with BAFTA’s values," the statement from BAFTA said. "This has led to Mr. Weinstein’s suspension, and it will be followed by a formal process as laid out in BAFTA’s constitution."

"We hope this announcement sends a clear message that such behaviour has absolutely no place in our industry," the statement continued. "BAFTA will continue to work with the film, games and television industries to improve access to rewarding and fulfilling careers in safe, professional working environments."

Legion of Honor Award

French President Emmanuel Macron tweeted that he's taken steps to "remove" the Legion of Honor Award from Weinstein, who was presented with the award in 2012. It is the nation's highest honor, established in 1802 by Napoléon Bonaparte.

Other honorees include fashion designer Giorgio Armani, cosmetics mogul Elizabeth Arden, singer Bono and actor Tom Hanks.

Amazon Studios


The streaming company completely cut ties with The Weinstein Company last week following the allegations.

Amazon had been working with the company on two projects -- an untitled mafia drama series Weinstein was producing with David O. Russell, and a series titled "The Romanoffs," an eight-episode series from "Mad Men" creator Matt Weiner.

The mafia show, which The Hollywood Reporter noted was a deal estimated at $160 million, had already been greenlit to run for two seasons.

"Amazon Studios no longer plans on moving forward with the David O. Russell project. As for 'The Romanoffs,' Amazon intends to move forward without the involvement of The Weinstein Co.," Amazon Studios told The Hollywood Reporter in a statement Friday.

Russell, along with the show's stars Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore, agreed with the decision.

"We support Amazon’s decision and in light of recent news and out of respect for all those affected we have decided together that it is best to not move forward with this show," they said in a joint statement.

"In the Heights"


Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara A. Hudes, the creators of the hit Broadway musical, announced they want the musical's movie adaption rights back from The Weinstein Company.

The company snatched up the film's rights after Miranda's other hit musical, "Hamilton," became a Broadway success. Now, the creators don't want anything to do with the disgraced producer's company.

"As a woman, I can no longer do business with The Weinstein Company," Hudes wrote in a lengthy post on Twitter last week. "To those women who suffered directly at Harvey's hands, I extend my sincerest compassion and support. Unfortunately, my musical 'In the Heights' is tied up in the company...I hope The Weinstein Company has enough grace, in the wake of these revelations, to respect my stand as a woman, and allow us to extricate 'In the Heights' from them."

Hudes added, "He thrived on this. He built an empire on this. It's been hard for me to sleep at night. My stomach is in knots."

Miranda threw his support behind Hudes, writing on Twitter, "As usual, Quiara does the prose best. She speaks for us both."

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- About 50 ISIS fighters were killed in U.S. military airstrikes in Yemen targeting two training camps in the country's central region. One of the camps had gained notoriety last week as the scene of an ISIS training video that showed images of ISIS recruits appearing to be kicked in the groin to demonstrate their physical toughness.

"U.S. forces killed dozens of ISIS members in a strike on two ISIS training camps, Oct. 16, in Al Bayda Governorate, Yemen, disrupting the organization's attempts to train new fighters," the Pentagon said in a statement.

"ISIS used the camps to train militants to conduct terror attacks using AK-47s, machine guns, rocket-propelled grenade launchers and endurance training," it added.

A U.S. official said the American airstrikes were the first targeting ISIS in Yemen, a country better known as the home of al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).

The U.S. military has conducted more than 100 airstrikes this year against AQAP, almost triple last year's strikes. Carried out mostly by drones, the strikes are part of an increased effort to rein in the al Qaeda affiliate's terror and territorial ambitions.

Both manned and unmanned aircraft were involved in Monday's airstrikes against the two ISIS camps that were about 20 miles apart, said the U.S. official.

One of the camps earned notoriety last week in an ISIS propaganda video that showed a line of ISIS recruits seeming to be kicked in the crotch to demonstrate their mental and physical toughness.

Some local fighting groups in Yemen first aligned themselves with ISIS in 2014, the year that ISIS had its most significant territorial gains in Iraq and Syria.

"Strikes against ISIS targets disrupt and destroy militants' attack-plotting efforts, leadership networks, and freedom of maneuver within the region," said the Pentagon statement.

Yemen is involved in a civil war where military forces from Gulf allies have been fighting against Houthi rebels to restore Yemen's government to power. That power vacuum led to a resurgence by AQAP and the emergence of ISIS in Yemen.

"ISIS has used the ungoverned spaces of Yemen to plot, direct, instigate, resource and recruit for attacks against America and its allies around the world," said the Pentagon statement. "For years, Yemen has been a hub for terrorist recruiting, training and transit."

The U.S. military coordinates with the Yemeni government to carry out counterterrorism operations in Yemen against ISIS and AQAP to prevent both groups from carrying out external terror attacks and limit the territory they control in Yemen.

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NBC/Trae Patton(NEW YORK) -- Miley Cyrus is heading back to Saturday Night Live.

The singer and judge of The Voice will be the musical guest on November 4, while Larry David will host. It will mark her fourth appearance on the show.

Miley first hosted SNL in 2011, then pulled double-duty as both host and musical guest in 2013 and 2015.

So far, this season of SNL has included performances by Jay-Z, Sam Smith and Pink.

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Michael Zagaris/San Francisco 49ers/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick has filed a grievance against the NFL, alleging the owners colluded to keep him out of the league because of his protests during the playing of the national anthem before games.

The grievance alleges the league's owners "colluded to deprive Mr. Kaepernick of employment rights in retaliation for Mr. Kaepernick's leadership and advocacy for equality and social justice."

The NFL did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Instead of filing the grievance through the NFL Players Association, Kaepernick has hired attorney Mark Geragos, who has represented several high-profile clients, including Michael Jackson, former NASCAR driver Jeremy Mayfield and musician Chris Brown.

Geragos said in a statement given to exclusively to ABC News Sunday night that the grievance was filed "only after pursuing every possible avenue with all NFL teams and their executives."

Kaepernick's goal, he said, was just to be treated fairly and to return to playing football in the NFL, "the league he performed at the highest level for."

The NFL Players Association said in a statement that it had been in contact with Kaepernick for the past year about his options, but only on Sunday learned he had decided to file the grievance, through media reports.

"Our union has a duty to assist Mr. Kaepernick as we do all players and we will support him," the statement said, adding that the union is scheduling a call with his advisers for early this week.

Kaepernick, who has not been with an NFL team since he severed his contract with the 49ers in March, began his silent protest of kneeling during the anthem in the 2016 preseason. He told the media he was protesting against the treatment of blacks in the United States.

Some other NFL players followed his lead during the 2016 season, drawing a mixed response from football fans and the general public, with some supporting the protest and others not.

But Kaepernick's most visible impact seemed to come at the start of this season, even though he himself had not been signed to a team, after President Trump at a campaign-style rally in Alabama slammed NFL players who participate in the protest.

The president told the crowd at the rally on Sept. 22 that teams should fire players who kneel during the anthem.

In response at NFL games over the next few days, many more players kneeled during the anthem or locked arms with teammates and in some cases also with their team's owners.

In his statement, Geragos did not name the president, but referred to Trump's call for protesting players to be fired, saying: "Athletes should not be denied employment based on partisan political provocation by the executive branch of our government. Such a precedent threatens all patriotic Americans and harkens back to our darkest days as a nation."

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Crystal Kaye(KANSAS CITY, Mo.) -- Crystal Kaye's work designing dolls to represent women with skin-pigment loss is drawing grateful responses from women across the country who are thrilled to have a doll that looks like them.

“I get messages from women saying that they’re in tears. Women in their 40s and 50s, crying because they’re so grateful to have something that mirrors them,” said Kaye of Kansas City, Missouri.

It all began about nine months ago when Kaye took a porcelain doll that her daughter was about to throw away.

Kaye, who already had an online store she calls Kays Customz for selling her handmade jewelry, stripped the doll down to make it her next canvas.

She started by designing a doll representing black women with albinism. Then she moved on to painting women with vitiligo.

Albinism is a condition in which people are born with little to no melanin. Vitiligo characteristically causes milky-white patches across the skin from a loss of melanin. Vitiligo affects an estimated 65 to 95 million people worldwide, although because of underreporting the actual number may be even higher, according to the Vitiligo Research Foundation.

Photos of Kaye's first dolls got thousands of likes and shares on Facebook, but the response to images of her creations with vitiligo was overwhelming, she said.

She has now had orders for over 150 of the dolls.

“It started as a hobby and spun into this,” she said.

Kaye designed a doll with a skin patch on her face in the shape of the African continent, an example of her positive portrayal of the skin condition.

Some women with vitiligo have asked Kaye for custom dolls that look like them.

Finally, a face like her own


“I always wanted a doll that looked like me,” said Que Chunn, a 38-year-old mother and nurse from Nashville who was one the first to order a custom doll from Kaye.

Chunn said she was diagnosed with vitiligo when she was 14. Because of what the condition did to her appearance, she said she was bullied and called names.

She learned of Kaye's work after family and friends saw the dolls on social media and tagged Chunn in the posts.

Kaye used a photo of Chunn to design a doll for her, then shipped it off.

The doll was sent to Chunn’s home in Nashville instead of the P.O. box she uses when traveling to different areas of the U.S. to serve as a nurse.

But Chunn couldn't wait.

She drove to Nashville and raced to her mailbox. “I couldn’t do anything but cry. It was beautiful. Every expectation and beyond,” Chunn said of the moment she unwrapped the doll to see a face like her own.

She keeps her doll in a glass case in her bedroom in Atlanta, where she is currently positioned as a travel nurse.

“It’s a good thing that she’s doing for this community,” Chunn says of Kaye's work for women with vitiligo, “We are never recognized.”

People with vitiligo now 'have a voice'

Tiffanie Wiley, 29, was diagnosed with vitiligo when she was 7 and the condition was only on her fingertips.

After it spread to other parts of her body, she started to get bullied at school.

Wiley said began wearing makeup when she was only 10 “as a favor to others.” But after her high school graduation, she said she started to embrace self-love.

She has since become a motivational speaker aiming to reduce bullying and increase tolerance through what she calls her #IAmGreat movement.

Stumbling upon Kaye’s doll art on Facebook, Wiley reached out for a custom order of a doll sporting an “I am great” slogan.

Kaye had the order done in a day.

“It was the first time I saw something that looked like Tiffanie,” Wiley says, referring to herself. She said the intricate details of the doll amaze her, the spots around her nose, the markings on her ears. “The things that most people don’t notice,” she said.

She now takes the doll on her motivational speaking engagements around her home in the Louisville, Kentucky, area.

The doll "gives you confidence ... because you see it and it’s beautiful,” says Wiley. “I am proud to have vitiligo.”

Tiffanie Wiley echoed the same sentiment saying, “I hope people understand that Kaye has opened a window for people with vitiligo to have a voice.”

Now many different people are ordering the dolls

Kaye says that she is now getting many different kinds of requests, including for dolls for burn victims from around the world.

“I want to do everybody. I want to do a doll with psoriasis, with eczema, anything that people haven’t seen before on a doll,” says Kaye, “I really want people, no matter what they look like or are going through, to know they are great and beautiful."

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