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Town of Frederick, CO(FREDERICK, Colo.) -- A pregnant Colorado mother and her two young daughters have mysteriously vanished -- and now the local police department has asked federal authorities and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation to join the case.

Shanann Watts, 34, and her two daughters -- Celeste, 3, and Bella, 4 -- were reported missing to the Frederick Police Department on Monday, according to a statement from the town of Frederick, which is about 35 miles north of Denver.

Watts' phone, purse and keys were left at home, said her husband, Chris Watts, according to ABC affiliate KMGH in Denver.

"When I came home and then walked in the house, nothing. Vanished. Nothing was here," he told KMGH.

Shanann Watts is 15 weeks pregnant, authorities said.

Authorities did not release additional information, but are seeking federal assistance from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

The worried husband and father described 3-year-old Celeste as "a bottle of energy," while 4-year-old Bella is "the more calm, cautious, mothering type."

"My kids are my life," he told KMGH. "I mean, those smiles light up my life."

Anyone with information is urged to call the Frederick Police Department at 720-382-5700.



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Ben Hassett(LOS ANGELES) -- Over the past few years, Emma Stone has accomplished things that most actresses only dream of, including taking home the Oscar in 2017 for her starring role in La La Land.

But recently, she's been relishing a quieter life away from the craziness of film sets, telling her pal Jennifer Lawrence in an interview for Elle magazine that she hasn't shot anything in six months.

To fill her time, the actress, who will turn 30 in November, has been traveling and spending time with the people she loves.

"I think it’s been a good time to get a little perspective, because things were so heavy work-wise for the past few years. And honestly, so many of my dreams are now personal and less professional," she says. "It’s less thinking about the next 10 years and what needs to happen and just sort of relaxing into what will be, instead of trying to control the outcome."

When pressed by Lawrence if she's hoping a husband and children might one day factor into her life, Stone -- who is not currently in a public romantic relationship -- says that she never expected it to, but she's thinking about it more now that she's approaching the big 3-0.

"My perspective about kids has changed as I've gotten older," she says. "I never babysat or anything. As a teenager, I was like, 'I’m never getting married, I’m never having kids.' And then I got older and I was like, 'I really want to get married, I really want to have kids."

"It’s the turning-30 thing where you’re like, 'I’m not that young,'" she continued. "I’m young, but I’m not that young."

Stone will next star in the upcoming Netflix miniseries, Maniac, which premieres September 21.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) -- It happens far too often: Drivers struggle to keep their eyes open, putting themselves and other drivers at risk.

Earlier this year, a driver launched nearly 30 feet through his windshield after slamming into a tollbooth in Florida.

Officials later discovered drowsy driving was the cause.

A report from the Governors Highway Safety Association found there's an average of 328,000 drowsy-driving crashes every year in the U.S., with more than half caused by drivers younger than 25.

General Motors has developed a suit to test the effects of driving while drowsy. Senior transportation correspondent David Kerley suited up with 23 pounds of weights on his wrists, ankles, and chest and put on goggles that distorted his vision to recreate the delayed reaction that can accompany drowsiness.

Chevy safety engineer Maureen Short said one of the biggest problems about driving while drowsy is impaired decision making.

"Drowsiness, unfortunately, it generally happens over time," Short said. "The problem is, you as a driver are a very poor judge of how tired you are."

While caffeine may seem like a quick fix, it is highly unpredictable, Short added.

A report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) found that a driver who drinks coffee can still have "microsleeps" or briefly lose consciousness for a few seconds – more than enough time to cause an accident.

The NHTSA also said that drivers who still want to drink coffee can drink one or two cups and then pull over for a 20-minute nap at a safe, designated stop. This has been shown to increase alertness, but only for short periods.

The best thing to do is get consistent rest, especially before longer drives.

"Nothing's going to be as good as six to eight hours of sleep," Short said. "That's the only thing that really helps you."

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images(LONDON) -- The morning after a 29-year-old man allegedly crashed his silver Ford Fiesta outside the Houses of Parliament, authorities are discussing the possibility of making the area a car-free zone.

Speaking on Wednesday to Sky News, Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said "there may well be a case" for making parts of Westminster pedestrian-only.

"We've got to do that carefully. We shouldn't just take an on-the-hoof response to what was a very disturbing incident," Grayling told Sky News.

On Tuesday, a man allegedly drove into a group of cyclists and crashed into the barriers outside the Houses of Parliament. Two people, a man and a woman, were taken to the hospital, while a third person was treated at the scene for minor injuries, authorities said. None of the injuries were life-threatening.

Police said that the driver, a U.K. national originally from Sudan whom they have not named, was arrested on suspicion of the commission, preparation, and instigation of acts of terrorism as well as attempted murder. He remains in custody at a south London police station, authorities said.

Speaking to LBC Radio in London, Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick said she expects to discuss the issue of making the area around the Houses of Parliament car-free with security services.

"You will notice that the security around parliament -- both in terms of armed officers and police officers and physical barriers -- has been further enhanced over the last several months and there is more to come on that in further months," Dick told LBC Radio.

Dick added that the matter would be discussed "parliamentary authorities, us, the intelligence agencies and indeed the local authorities and the mayor."

For his part, London Mayor Sadiq Khan told ITV Wednesday that he supported plans to ban cars in the area.

"I've been an advocate for a while now of part-pedestrianizing Parliament Square, but making sure we don't lose the wonderful thing about our democracy, which is people having access to parliamentarians, people being able to lobby Parliament, visitors being able to come and visit Parliament," Khan told the channel.

Former London Mayor Ken Livingstone backed a $22 million plan to partially restrict traffic around Parliament Square in 2007 in time for the 2012 Olympics, but his successor, Boris Johnson, tossed out the plans, claiming it would cause congestion.

In an interview with Talk Radio Tuesday, Conservative MP Nigel Evans also called for the area to be pedestrianized to "protect politicians," adding that Tuesday's attack "would certainly ignite the debate" over such plans again.

Cressida Dick, the Scotland Yard boss, said it is about taking "reasonable measures" to protect popular sites in the city.

"The terrorists want us to completely change our way of life, they want us to be afraid and they want us to stop doing what we want to do to lead a normal life in the U.K. We're not going to give in. We're not going to just change our lifestyle," Dick told LBC Radio.

"But it is important that we take reasonable measures -- as I think we have been doing over the last several months -- to try to make sure that the most iconic sites, including those in Central London, are well protected and if something does happen there, then the police are able to respond very quickly with armed officers, which is what we saw yesterday," Dick added.


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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(ALEXANDRIA, Va.) -- Closing statement are underway in the financial crimes trial of Paul Manafort, the former campaign chairman for Donald Trump, and prosecutors are taking the opportunity to paint Manafort as a liar and a schemer.

"When you follow the trail of Mr. Manafort's money, it's littered with lies,” special counsel prosecutor Greg Andres said in federal court on Wednesday, telling jurors that Manafort is “not above the law.”

Manafort is on trial in Alexandria, Virginia, where special counsel Robert Mueller has accused Manafort of shielding millions of dollars in off-shore bank accounts from American tax-collectors. During his closing arguments, Andres reminded jurors of the $60 million Manafort is accused of hiding in 31 separate bank accounts.

"He lied to his tax preparers, he lied to his bookkeeper, because he wanted to hide that money and avoid paying taxes," Andres added.

If found guilty, Manafort, 69, faces a prison sentence of up to 305 years. Manafort has pleaded not guilty to all charges.

Special counsel prosecutors rested their case on Monday after bringing more than two dozen accountants and associates of Manafort to the stand. On Tuesday, Manafort’s defense team declined to mount a defense or bring any witnesses to the stand.

After closing statements from both sides, a 12-person jury will deliberate and return their verdict.



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Don Juan Moore/Getty ImagesBY: Chris Herring and Dimitrije Ćurčić

(NEW YORK) -- Of all the shocking NBA free-agency moves this summer, Isaiah Thomas’s deal with Denver — for just one year, at the minimum salary for a veteran player — might have been the most telling, in terms of where the league is heading.

This time last year, Thomas — one of the NBA’s most underpaid players even then, at just over $6 million — was saying openly that the Celtics “know they’ve got to bring the Brink’s truck out,” a reference to the nine-figure max contract he felt he deserved. And on some level, it would have been difficult to argue with him. At 28 years old, the diminutive point guard was coming off a banner season in which he finished fifth in MVP voting while averaging almost 29 points per game (on one of the league’s best true shooting percentages) and led the Celtics to the East’s best record.

It’s no secret that much of the market collapse for Thomas’s services stemmed from questions about the torn labrum in his hip, which cost him months of rehab time before he ever suited up for the Cavs, then required surgery in March (while he was playing for the Lakers). But it also appears that the ever-changing NBA flipped its script entirely just before Thomas could cash in on a deal that scorers of his caliber generally get. The about-face highlights the fear teams have about committing big money to someone as short as Thomas, given the challenges his height creates in yet another league where an increasing number of players are roughly the same size.

Point guards and centers were closer in height last year than they’ve ever been, separated by an average of just 8.3 inches — down 21 percent from the 10.5 inches or so that stood between them during the mid-to-late 1990s, according to data from Basketball-Reference.com.

Basketball-Reference.com

Those shifts affect Thomas in two meaningful ways. First, the Tacoma, Washington, native — who, at just 5-foot-9, is the shortest player in the NBA — isn’t even close to the average size for a point guard of 6 feet, 2.5 inches. Which brings up the second issue: As such an outlier, the undersized Thomas becomes an even bigger liability on defense when his team is forced to switch on screens at that end of the floor — something that’s become far more common in the past five years alone. The median number of switches leaguewide has more than doubled over that span, from 4.3 per 100 possessions in 2013-14 to 9.1 switches per 100 possessions this past season, according to Second Spectrum.

“To even have a chance against a team like Golden State, you have to make a point of not being put into rotations,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni told me in May. “They’ll kill you that way.”

Certain teams are better equipped to play that kind of defense than others — the Rockets and Warriors, widely considered the league’s best teams, led the NBA in switch frequency — but the process doesn’t always work as well when Thomas is in the midst of it. The Celtics were 5 percent more efficient defensively in switch scenarios when Thomas was off the floor than on in 2016-17, according to Second Spectrum. And while Thomas’s departure coincided with a slew of other changes in Boston prior to last season, the team’s jump to from No. 12 to No. 1 in defensive efficiency after dealing Thomas supports the notion that a merely solid defensive team can become great on that side of the ball once it removes its weakest link.

With teams vying to become switchier in an increasingly versatile league (and some clubs perhaps having pushed the envelope too far on that front), it raises the dilemma of how to integrate Thomas into a defensive gameplan without torpedoing it altogether.


Even on offense, where Thomas is undoubtedly a boon, his greatest strengths are ones accentuated by a particular style of play. With Boston, he made use of direct-dribble handoffs more than anyone — a play that worked well alongside screen-setter Al Horford in part because coach Brad Stevens was committed to building an offense in which Thomas could thrive. The plays didn’t work as well in Cleveland, where the Cavs ran them about half as often and with less efficiency. (The same was true during his stint with the Lakers, according to Second Spectrum.)

Taken together, this suggests that Thomas — like most players but perhaps unlike most stars — needs a specific ecosystem around him in order for him to thrive, or for him to be the max-level talent he believes himself to be. He could be that player in Boston, where the Celtics had good defenders and players that could not only screen but also space the floor for him. The likelihood of that being true on a team with far less talent seems remote.

Thomas’s new situation in Denver splits the middle from that standpoint. He will be in an up-tempo system with an abundance of talented players, including Nikola Jokic, Paul Millsap and FiveThirtyEight favorite Gary Harris, among others. Thomas has also played previously for coach Michael Malone, the first NBA head man to coax 20 points per game out of him. But there’s a catch: The Nuggets, like last year’s Cavs, play almost no D, meaning Thomas won’t be able to expect much help on that end as he works to rebuild his value as a sixth man.

Again, the tactical constraints of Thomas’s size are far from the only question marks surrounding him. The health of his hip is key, obviously. The Cleveland situation — a particular challenge because of the win-now pressure created by LeBron James’s pending free agency — was disastrous for Thomas: The team’s awful defense made him a bad fit, and his penchant for taking shots at either teammates or coaches became problematic. His difficulties were compounded by the seesaw nature of the free-agent money that’s changed hands in recent years.

When Thomas began talking about being paid handsomely, it was during the summer of a massive salary-cap increase, when players like Evan Turner, Bismack Biyombo and Nicolas Batum — who’ve never been All-Stars — got $70 million, $72 million and $120 million, respectively. Mistakes from 2016 are still being felt by certain teams, and it doesn’t help that some are keeping the books clear ahead of next year, when several stars are expected to hit the market. So, much of this boils down to Thomas’s free agency coming at the worst time.

“You can always play the what-if game, but man, I’ve been F’ed over so many times,” Thomas told ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski, while acknowledging that potential suitors were undoubtedly concerned about the health of his hip. “But of course I think about [the money]. I’m human.”

If there’s a bright side, or at least a glass-half-full equation, it’s that Thomas can still redeem himself. He is, or at least can be, a supremely gifted scorer. Yes, he gets his shots blocked often, but Thomas has learned how to use angles as leverage, and he displays bursts of quickness to outsmart defenders. Prior to his truncated 2017-18, he was driving to the basket more than almost anyone, and he connected on a high percentage of his shots around the rim. He’s still proven to be automatic from the line. And in the past, Thomas has shown he can catch fire from deep.

As he’s done so many times before, Thomas, famously the last player picked in the 2011 draft, will have to overcome the odds. He may not even need the absolute perfect fit to begin building his value again. Instead, Thomas may just need the ever-shifting NBA to sit still just long enough for him to find a new normal.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- It's August, and if you feel like you’re stuck at the office while everyone else is on vacation, you’re actually not alone.

American employees forfeited 212 million paid vacation days in 2017, the equivalent of more than $62 billion dollars lost in benefits, according to Project: Time Off, a coalition of organizations working to change Americans’ thinking and behavior around vacation time.

"Americans are unique in that they don't use all their vacation days [they earn]," said Katie Denis, the coalition’s chief of research and strategy. "They fear that they'll look replaceable or that they might not look as dedicated."

"I think we should be concerned about what our lives look like when we don't take it," she said.

The health benefits of using vacation days granted by an employer include decreased stress, improved quality of sleep and a lower risk of heart disease, studies show.

"When you have vacation time, you've earned it. You do have a right to use it. That's part of your compensation package," Denis said. "You earn it and you deserve it and you should take it."

Using vacation days to not only take a break from work but to travel can also have benefits, according to Project: Time Off's data.

Americans who take all or most of their vacation days to travel report being 20 percent happier with their personal relationships and 56 percent happier with their health and well-being than those who travel with little or none of their vacation time, the coalition found in its State of American Vacation 2018 report.

Employees who use their vacation days to travel also report being happier with their jobs and more likely to report receiving a promotion.

Vacation days not only help employees, but employers too.

Mark Douglas, CEO of SteelHouse, a digital marketing firm, saw the benefits firsthand when he started giving his employees unlimited vacation, a $2,000 per year travel allowance that can only be used for vacations and a three-day weekend every month.

"The initial reaction when we announced it was people erupted clapping and cheering," Douglas recalled. "It gave everyone a sense that the company really cared about their wellness, about their well-being, about them [and] this has really contributed to the morale."

Alexa Tierney, a SteelHouse employee, said it would be a challenge to move to a job with less benefits and flexibility after four years at SteelHouse. She has also found she's a better employee.

"As long as you are doing good work and getting everything done, you can enjoy your time off," she said. "My productivity is better because I had that freedom to take vacation."

If you're not in a job with unlimited vacation days, you can maximize the days you have, and even ask for more, according to Denis.

To maximize the vacation days you have earned, Denis recommends requesting time off as far in advance as possible. Also think about your time off as a day here and there, instead of having to take it in larger spaces of time, like a week.

"Schedule a day [off]," Denis said. "It doesn't always have to be a big bucket list trip, but just do it for yourself. Do it for your family. You will be glad you did."

If you want to ask for more vacation days in your benefits package, here are five tips from Denis, in her own words.

1. Start the conversation

a conversation can be a powerful way to boost your vacation culture, which can go a long way for the company as a whole.

There's nothing wrong with starting a conversation saying, "Hey, I've worked really hard lately. I've accomplished these things, and I want to make sure that I am happy here, thriving here and staying here a long time. Vacation really matters to me. What can we do to up the number of days that I'm earning?"

2. Ask for a slight increase

If the policy says you get 15 days, don't ask for 50 [days]. That's going to be too much, but you could ask for a modest increase over that.

If you don't get the OK on getting more vacation days when you start, set a check-in after six months or a year and say, "Can we look at this again? Can we revisit it?" That's really the time to establish that, the same way you would any salary negotiation.

3. Bring the evidence

The strongest information you can have isn't about benchmarks or national data or any of that.

The strongest thing you can do is present what you've done in your career that makes you warrant more vacation days. It's a very individual thing. Vacation is very personal to people, and there's no reason the ask for more vacation shouldn't be just as personal.

4. Request a number that works for you

There's no right amount of vacation. It's all a matter of feel. But I would say, if you earn those days, you deserve them, you should use them and put them to good use.

5. Ask early in your job negotiation

There's no wrong time to negotiate for more vacation days, but it gets harder if you've been there for a while. When you're going into a new job, that's the time when you've really got a little bit more power to negotiate.

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