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iStock/Thinkstock(WHITTIER, Calif.) -- Two AR-15s and 90 high-capacity magazines were found at the home of a "disgruntled" teenager who was allegedly overheard threatening a school shooting, the Los Angeles County Sheriff said.

On Feb. 16, two days after the Florida high school massacre, the 17-year-old boy allegedly said "he was going to shoot up the school some time in the next three weeks," Sheriff Jim McDonnell said at a news conference Wednesday.

The alleged threat was overheard by a school security officer at El Camino High School, located in Whittier, California.

Authorities found two AR-15s, two handguns and 90 high-capacity magazines at the teen's home, but the boy's older brother, an Army veteran, claimed the guns belonged to him, according to McDonnell.

One AR-15 was registered to the older brother and the other was not registered, officials said.

The teenager was arrested for making criminal threats while the older brother was arrested on charges including possession of an assault weapon and failure to register a handgun, McDonnell said.

The school security officer who allegedly overheard the teen told reporters Wednesday, "I'm not a hero. I'm just doing my job."

The teen had an extensive disciplinary history at the school, McDonnell added.

McDonnell said that was the second serious threat at El Camino High School that week. On Feb. 15, a student who had been suspended told his mother he wanted a school administrator dead, the sheriff said. The mother reported her son, saying she did not know what he was capable of, the sheriff said.

On Feb. 14, 17 people were gunned down at a Florida high school, allegedly by a former student.

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Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Wilhelmina Models(NEW YORK) -- Wendy Williams is taking an extended break.

On the Wendy Williams Show on Wednesday, the daytime host announced she was taking three weeks off starting Thursday to deal with complications from hyperthyroidism and Graves’ disease.

"My doctor has prescribed ... are you ready? As of today, three weeks of vacation," she told the audience. "What? Who are you? I was p***ed."

During the show, Wendy described some of the symptoms of her illness.

"I have been telling you for awhile. I wake up, I can't sleep. Then I told you I take the melatonin," she explained. "Well, difficulty swallowing. Rapid heart beat, yes. Yes. And intolerance for heat."

In a statement to ABC News, a show rep says Williams must follow doctor's orders.

“Wendy is a true champion and has never missed a day of work. But her health and well-being must be put before all else. Wendy has been openly dealing with her Graves’ disease for many years in addition to hyperthyroidism," the statement reads.

"Yesterday, Wendy’s doctor prescribed a necessary three weeks of rest to get her levels and medication in sync. The show will be in repeats during this unplanned hiatus. A live show was produced today so that Wendy could speak directly to her fans and explain her condition.”

However, according to Wendy, she may try to work around that.

"Even though I have been off for one week. I'm gonna fix that. I'll be back in two," she said. "I'm not an heiress. Who's gonna pay my bills? Are you serious? I'm just saying. I come from working class. Work, work, work, that's all I do is work, work, work. But for the next few, I won't be."

The time off follows Wendy’s recent on-air health scares. Last week, she cancelled shows due to "flu-like symptoms" and she fainted on-air during her Halloween episode in 2017.

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Diaa Al-Din Samout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Pro-government forces pounded rebel-held Eastern Ghouta for the fourth day in a row Wednesday, killing at least 38 civilians, including four children, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a U.K.-based monitoring group said.

Since Sunday night, Syrian and Russian airstrikes and shelling killed at least 310 civilians, including 72 children, in Eastern Ghouta, Rami Abdurrahman, the director of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, told ABC News.

“The warplanes are still in the sky,” Nour Adam, a media activist in Eastern Ghouta, who asked that his real family name be withheld out of safety concerns for family members in government-held territory, told ABC News on Wednesday. “People are in the shelters and shops are closed.”

An estimated 400,000 people are trapped in Eastern Ghouta with little access to food, water, fuel, electricity and health care, according to the UN. Many of them have left their homes and moved into underground shelters, where they spend their days and nights in hiding due to the intensity of the strikes.

The recent surge in violence in Eastern Ghouta, which has been besieged by the Syrian government since 2013, is part of President Bashar al-Assad’s campaign to seize Syria’s last remaining opposition-held territories.

On Monday and Tuesday, a total of 13 medical facilities were attacked in Eastern Ghouta, according to the Syrian American Medical Society. Three of SAMS’ medical staff in Eastern Ghouta were killed during those two days. One of them, a nurse, lost her life as she tried to escape the bombing on the hospital where she worked in the town of Arbin on Tuesday, SAMS said. Airstrikes continued to "relentlessly target the vicinity of the hospital for five hours, also directly hitting ambulances," SAMS said in a statement. At least 300 patients and medical staff were trapped in the hospital as staff moved patients to safer areas within the hospital, according to SAMS.

The United Nations secretary-general, Antonio Guterres, appealed on Wednesday for an immediate ceasefire in Eastern Ghouta, allowing humanitarian aid to reach people there. A truce should also allow the evacuation of an estimated 700 people who need urgent treatment outside of the besieged enclave, he said.

“I am deeply saddened by the terrible suffering of the civilian population in eastern Ghouta – 400,000 people that live in hell on earth,” he told the U.N. Security Council. “I know that very important consultations are taking place in this Council, aiming at a cessation of hostilities during one month in Syria, with a number of conditions, and of course I fully support that effort, but I believe eastern Ghouta cannot wait.”

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Former Trump campaign staffer Sam Nunberg is expected to meet with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team on Thursday in Washington, according to a source with knowledge. 

Nunberg spoke on the record about the Trump campaign in Michael Wolff’s book “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.” Before the book published, leaked passages showed Nunberg quoted as reportedly calling President Trump as an "idiot" in a conversation with Trump's former chief strategist, Steve Bannon.

In an interview with ABC News' "The Briefing Room" on Jan. 4, Nunberg said he "probably" called the commander-in-chief an "idiot" in the conversation with Wolff, but maintained that the comment was sarcastic.

Nunberg also declined to dispute another exchange in the book in which he reportedly described his struggle to explain the Constitution to Trump.

“I got as far as the Fourth Amendment before his finger is pulling down on his lip and his eyes are rolling back in his head," Wolff writes of Nunberg's recollection.

Nunberg was fired in August of 2015.

Nunberg declined ABC News' request for comment.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The Federal Communication Commission could officially repeal the Obama-era "net neutrality" rules by publishing the order to the National Register on Thursday, according to three sources briefed on the matter, inevitably triggering a wave of opposing lawsuits from state attorneys general.

The National Register is the official journal of U.S. federal government regulations, and one source stressed the timing of the FCC's publication could shift from Thursday.

The reversal is a hallmark victory for FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, whose tenure has seen him strongly advocate for reduced regulation in lockstep with the president who appointed him: Donald Trump.

Reversal supporters claimed the rules unnecessarily regulate the industry and impede the free market.

"It is not the job of the government to pick the winners and losers of the internet. ... We should have a level playing field," Pai said on December 14 when the FCC voted along party lines -- three Republicans to two Democrats -- to roll back the landmark net neutrality rules imposed in 2015 under President Barack Obama.

Those who support the net neutrality rules are more likely to find a resolution in federal court than Congress.

In the unlikely event that Democrats gain enough support in the House of Representatives within the 60-day deadline to overturn the decision, the president has already expressed support for the repeal and is unlikely to sign any opposing legislation.

A coalition of state attorneys general have signaled their intention to sue the FCC and block what they called an "illegal rollback of net neutrality" once the final rule is published by the FCC.

In order for that final rule to take effect, the White House Office of Management and Budget will have to sign off, which is expected to happen quickly.

The Office of Management and Budget did not immediately respond to an ABC News request for comment.

A number of prominent technology companies have voiced their opposition to the reversal, including Netflix, Amazon, Twitter and Microsoft.

A spokesperson for Pai did not respond to ABC News' request for comment.

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Pima County Sheriff's Office (TUCSON, Ariz.) -- An Arizona couple was arrested for child abuse after allegedly locking their adopted children in rooms without food, water or a bathroom, officials said.

The investigation began Saturday when a boy in "disheveled condition" asked to use the phone at a Family Dollar store in Tucson, and the store clerk called 911 to report the suspicious activity, the Pima County Sheriff's Office said in a news release Tuesday.

When deputies responded to the boy's home, they found four children -- ages 6 to 12 -- and learned they were kept in separate bedrooms that were locked from the outside, the sheriff's office said.

The sheriff's office said the children were regularly kept in their locked rooms for up to 12 hours at a time without access to food, water, a bathroom or lights.

One bedroom had a bucket as a toilet, the sheriff's office said.

The child who asked to use the Family Dollar store phone had escaped through a window at the home, according to the sheriff's office.

The other four children were removed from the home while the adoptive parents, Benito Gutierrez, 69, and Carol Gutierrez, 64, were arrested and each charged with three counts of child abuse, the sheriff's office said.

They made their first court appearance Wednesday morning and were held on $25,000 bond, reported ABC affiliate KGUN-TV in Tucson. They return to court March 5.

Last month, two Southern California parents were arrested for allegedly holding their 13 children captive in their home.

David and Louise Turpin allegedly forced the children to shower only once a year, shackled them and beat them routinely, prosecutors said. The victims weren't released from their chains even to go to the bathroom, according to prosecutors.

They were arrested after the couple’s 17-year-old daughter escaped and alerted authorities.

David and Louise Turpin have each been charged with 12 counts of torture, 12 counts of false imprisonment, seven counts of abuse of a dependent adult and six counts of child abuse. David Turpin was also charged with one count of a lewd act on a child under the age of 14 by force, fear or duress. They have pleaded not guilty.

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Nils Petter Nilsson/Getty Images(PYEONGCHANG, South Korea) -- Americans Jessica Diggins and Kikkan Randall, the only mom athlete on Team USA, made history on Wednesday by winning gold in the women’s team sprint cross-country event at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

It’s the first-ever Olympic cross-county gold medal for the United States and the first-ever Olympic medal in the sport for U.S. women.

Diggins, 26, had an incredibly strong push in the last lap and came from behind to win. "In the final stretch, I was just thinking, 'Go, go, go. I'm giving it everything I had, and I've got someone who I really love and care about waiting for me at the finishing line, and I just want to make her proud.’’

Randall, who was on edge watching the final lap, said, "I felt like Charlotte Kalla [of Sweden] and I had a screaming match. Her teammate was coming down and she went, 'Come on.' And I went, 'Diggins,' and I had so much adrenaline as she was coming down.”

“But if there's anybody I'd have 100 percent faith in coming down that finishing stretch as fast as possible, it's Jessie. So that was just a wonderful feeling to take it all in and watch it happen," Randall, 35, added.

Bill Koch won the United States’ first Olympic cross-country medal 42 years ago at the 1976 Olympics, taking home a silver medal in the 30-kilometer (18 miles) event. Cross-country, or Nordic, skiing has been an Olympic event since the games in 1924 in Chamonix, France, but the women’s event wasn’t added until 1952.

Randall, of Alaska, is ending on a career high, earning the gold medal in her fifth and final Olympics. She missed the 2014 Sochi Games because of a strain in her lower back. She also gave birth to her son, Breck, in April 2016.

“It still doesn't feel real,” she said. “It's what I've been working on for 20 years and with this team for the last five years and -- wow."

Diggins, of Minnesota, made her Olympic debut in Sochi four years ago, placing eight in the individual skiathon. But she redeemed herself Wednesday with a strong finish, surpassing her Norwegian competitors at the very end to clench the gold medal.

ABC News contributor Steven Nyman, who competed in three Olympics for the United States and is friends with Randall and Diggins, became emotional watching the event.

“History was truly made tonight -- the first Olympic medal for any American woman in cross-country," Nyman said. "It has been a long time in the making, and no better two to make it happen. Kikkan Randall inspired a whole movement or youth skiers, and for her to win this medal alongside the future of the team and Jessie Diggins was incredible.”


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US skiers make history at Olympics with cross-country gold

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